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  #21  
Old August 4th, 2020
Dgc333 Dgc333 is offline
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I have had a detector in all my vehicles continuously since 1975. They have all been hardwired to come on when the vehicle is started and power down when the vehicle is shut off. All of them have been mounted to the windshield above the review mirror when there is room other wise just below the mirror. The only time any of them are taken down is if i have to park in a sketchy area which is not often. So they sit on the windshield on 95 degree summer days and subzero winter nights.

I typically keep them 7 or 8 years before updating to current technology and i can only recall one actually failing and that was a different brand unit back in the 80s.

Making electronics survive in an automotive environment is well understood and i would think any reputable manufactuer of radar detectors would design/build for the environment. My experience suggests they do.

Dave

Last edited by flylow7f39; August 5th, 2020 at 02:10 AM.
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  #22  
Old August 4th, 2020
mtime mtime is online now
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Hopefully heat won't be an issue .....but just in case, When I mounted the RD above the mirror, I added a small self adhesive bumper to the left corner for the RD to rest on. My thought is this will reduce the weight and stress on the sticky cup and prevent the sticky cup from giving way in heat. It's and idea and we'll see if it succeeds!
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  #23  
Old August 4th, 2020
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Originally Posted by mtime View Post
Hopefully heat won't be an issue .....but just in case, When I mounted the RD above the mirror, I added a small self adhesive bumper to the left corner for the RD to rest on. My thought is this will reduce the weight and stress on the sticky cup and prevent the sticky cup from giving way in heat. It's and idea and we'll see if it succeeds!
It shouldn’t fall. Hopefully not!
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  #24  
Old August 5th, 2020
richie_redbull richie_redbull is offline
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My thought is this will reduce the weight and stress on the sticky cup and prevent the sticky cup from giving way in heat.
they don't give way, they blow up from the pressure build up in the heat.
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  #25  
Old August 5th, 2020
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they don't give way, they blow up from the pressure build up in the heat.
Well remember theres lots of people that are not having issues, so lets wait and see what happens.
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  #26  
Old August 5th, 2020
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TheBlackKnight239 TheBlackKnight239 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dgc333 View Post
I have had a detector in all my vehicles continuously since 1975. They have all been hardwired to come on when the vehicle is started and power down when the vehicle is shut off. All of them have been mounted to the windshield above the review mirror when there is room other wise just below the mirror. The only time any of them are taken down is if i have to park in a sketchy area which is not often. So they sit on the windshield on 95 degree summer days and subzero winter nights.

I typically keep them 7 or 8 years before updating to current technology and i can only recall one actually failing and that was a different brand unit back in the 80s.

Making electronics survive in an automotive environment is well understood and i would think any reputable manufactuer of radar detectors would design/build for the environment. My experience suggests they do.

Dave

This is very helpful and I appreciate you taking the time to respond. Mine will stay up all the time. I love my blendmount with the hardwire. Will never do anything else. Just love ❤️ my RL360c.


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Last edited by flylow7f39; August 5th, 2020 at 02:10 AM.
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  #27  
Old August 5th, 2020
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MurrayB MurrayB is offline
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RL360c on a BlendMount is the best. I use a mirror tap clean install and the RL360c turns on when the car wakes up.
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  #28  
Old 2 Days Ago
if6ws9 if6ws9 is offline
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About 3-4 years ago I read an article that stated there was a component in a radar detector that isn't supposed to be exposed to prolonged heat above 80 something degrees. I can't recall what the component is but during the summer in Florida a car will get a lot hotter than 80 something degrees. A vehicle parked in the sun for one hour can reach an average cabin temperature of 116 degrees. In a locked vehicle, a dark dashboard, steering wheel or seat can often reach temperature ranges of 180 - 200 degrees, which then warms the air trapped inside a vehicle. I always dismounted my Redline O from its Blendmount when I parked and now I do the same with the RL 360c but it's much easier because of the mag mount. Aside from the heat there are people whose job it is to look inside of parked cars, theft is part of what they do for a living. I'm not taking any chances with an $800 radar detector, I don't want to invite a thief by leaving it on display. Just my .02
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  #29  
Old 2 Days Ago
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Originally Posted by if6ws9 View Post
About 3-4 years ago I read an article that stated there was a component in a radar detector that isn't supposed to be exposed to prolonged heat above 80 something degrees. I can't recall what the component is but during the summer in Florida a car will get a lot hotter than 80 something degrees. A vehicle parked in the sun for one hour can reach an average cabin temperature of 116 degrees. In a locked vehicle, a dark dashboard, steering wheel or seat can often reach temperature ranges of 180 - 200 degrees, which then warms the air trapped inside a vehicle. I always dismounted my Redline O from its Blendmount when I parked and now I do the same with the RL 360c but it's much easier because of the mag mount. Aside from the heat there are people whose job it is to look inside of parked cars, theft is part of what they do for a living. I'm not taking any chances with an $800 radar detector, I don't want to invite a thief by leaving it on display. Just my .02
These detectors are built to withstand heat and conditions like that, however I think what you do is very wise, and it does seem if things get to 180-200 degrees that is excessive.
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If you need immediate help please contact Escort Customer service by calling 1-800-543-1608, option 2. , M-F 9:00AM-5:30PM EST..
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  #30  
Old 1 Day Ago
flylow7f39 flylow7f39 is offline
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I don't leave mine in the car overnight. I'd rather not have it stolen so it goes in the trunk when I park and I keep it inside the house when I'm at home.

Record high where I live is 104°F, record low -8°F, generally it might hit the mid 90s a couple of days per summer and drop into the mid teens for a few days in the winter.

I suspect they are just as durable as the air bag controller, ECU, HU and other electronics found in cars.

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Originally Posted by EscortRadar View Post
You aren't going to experience the low temperature the Max 360 can operate in and live for very long. If the Max 360 gets too hot then it will notify you and immediately shut down to not cause any permanent damage to the unit. This is at about 140'F ambient. Again, not a temperature that you will exist in for very long.
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How durable are these things in terms of temperatures? I live in New England where winters can be -10 and summer can be 100, does everyone take them out of their vehicles and bring them inside or leave them to bear the elements?
They are designed to operate in these temperatures. Excessive heat is the only thing that may cause undesired operation and damage. Should it get too hot then it will issue a warning and shut itself down to reduce the chances of permanent damage.
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I'm really not sure but I would bet it can operate in temperatures that you will not experience. I have had my 9500ix in temperatures around -20'F overnight and it still worked well. It digitally calibrates itself on power up and at regular intervals to compensate it's tuning for temperature.

For longevity's sake during extreme weather I recommend that you treat the detector as the precise microwave and laser receiver that it is and keep it in room temperature when not using it. Mine is still going strong after several winter/summer cycles in my car 24/7 but I am also using it as a long term test unit. If I paid for it, and had to pay for servicing it, I wouldn't expose it to these temperatures.

Update: I just found out that the minimum operating temperature is -14'F
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There have been a number of questions about temperature and its effect on RDs so I'm hoping to shed a little light on the subject with this post.

All electronic components (integrated circuits/resistors/capacitors/etc) have operating and storage temperature ranges specified by the manufacturer. The storage temperature range is larger than the operating temperature range and defines the temperature range the component can endure without fear of damage when there is no power applied (think of your RD sitting in your car when it's parked). The operating temperature range is the range of temperatures in which the component will operate correctly (without fear of damage) when power is applied.

The electronics industry has settled on 3 temperature range standards. These are Commercial temperature range, Industrial temperature range and Military temperature range. These ranges are:

Commercial: 0 to 70 degrees Celsius.
Industrial: -40 to 85 degrees Celsius.
Military: -55 to 125 degrees Celsius.

Hardware designers consider the expected operating and storage temperature range the unit is expected to encounter so that components with the appropriate temperature ranges can be chosen. Components operated (or stored) outside the rated temperature range will experience premature failures compared to components that operate and are stored within their rated temperature range.

Certain characteristics/parameters of electonic components also change with temperature. When the part is operated within its rated temperature range, these changes are bounded and well understood. Integrated circuits are one such component where temperature compensation is designed in so that the parts operation over the rated temperature is ensured.

Radar detectors operate in an automotive environment which is fairly hostile compared to room temperature environments. Typically, RD's are designed using components having Industrial temperature ranges. The Society of Automotive Engineers publishes guidelines for operating temperature ranges of equipment used in automotive environments. In the continental United States, automotive cabin interiors experience temperatures from -30 degrees F (Alaska winter nightime temperatures) up to almost 150 degrees F (closed car in Florida summer daytimes).

So while your flat screen TV is fairly reliable when designed with Commercial temperature range parts, your RD would not operate up to spec or last very long if Commercial temperature range (0 to 70 degrees Celsius) components are used.

Temperature effects also come into play when hardware designers wire components together to create the detectors sub-systems (RF receive circuitry, etc). Here, the hardware designer must understand and evaluate how the temperature behavior of component characteristics interact with each other and affect the circuit as a whole.

Even after choosing components with the appropriate temperature ranges, temperature may still have an effect on a detector subsystem, especially subsystem blocks that contain analog circuitry. For example, RF receive circuitry may experience changes in gain, dynamic range or their default operating point over temperature. Designers can often compensate for these temperature induced effects using dynamic or adaptive adjustments done under CPU control. This is one of the reasons why detectors designed for the long haul perform periodic auto/self-calibration.

So, is it bad to leave your RD on your windshield year-round?

There isn't a black or white answer. Seasonal temperature swings (summer/winter/summer/winter) will impact electronic component performance but studies have shown this effect takes a number of years to manifest. And products that perform a periodic self-calibration or self-adjustment can hold off negative effects for years more by compensating for component charateristic changes caused by temperature.

Ironically, seasonal temperature swings will accentuate poor quality manufacturing practices before killing off the electronic components. Marginal solder joints will fail after a few seasons of thermal cycling necessitating a return to the service center.

Dan
Excellent post DetectorDan! Temperature has a huge impact on our detectors and the products that they are designed to detect, radar guns.

Our detectors regularly calibrate themselves even while operating to maximize performance at all times Our custom installed detectors for example must be able to perform well in extreme temperatures from being mounted outside of the vehicle's cabin.

Radar's transmission frequency also varies with the temperature. This impacts GPS based false alert rejection because common sources of false alerts are located outside where they are subject to temperature changes (eg automatic door openers, construction zone and "your speed is ___" signs).

Our detectors with GPS based TrueLock and AutoLearn false alert rejection only store a small bandwidth for each false alert that they store. This is to minimize the potential of the detector ignoring another nearby signal which could be a threat. When the temperature changes enough, the false alert's frequency will drift outside of the value stored for the false and the detector will alert to it again. We regularly receive complaints of a detector falsing during seasonal temperature changes in spring and fall. You'll see this happen here on the forum Just give them some time and our detectors with AutoLearn will automatically adapt to the new frequency as you continue to make passes by these false alert signals.

Other detectors with manual-only GPS based filtering schemes counter this, and their inferior signal selectivity, by storing large chunks of bandwidth or the entire band (or even bands in some instances ). This is leaving you at great risk should police ever start enforcing speeds in areas where you have stored false alerts or where you have accidentally stored a threat as a false.
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Last edited by flylow7f39; 1 Day Ago at 01:24 PM.
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